BLOGS

The Hue and Cry Surrounding the Afghan Government Collapse – How Can I Be Wrong?

The Hue and Cry Surrounding the Afghan Government Collapse – How Can I Be Wrong?

I think not just in a severe conflict or war situations, but also in everyday life where sundry complexities abound and surround humans, this kind of a ‘thinking disposition’ empower the young to use effectively their reasoning and navigate their way through personal as well as professional quandaries that could be ambiguity ridden. Enculturating such thinking behaviors warrantees schools’ top priority and our schools need to make a surge of effort in this direction.

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A Kerkuffle around Teaching the Critical Race Theory

A Kerkuffle around Teaching the Critical Race Theory

In an apparent attempt to restrict the teaching of Critical Race Theory (CRT), the new Texas law (June 2021) prevents a teacher from exploring any topic (not just the state’s history of enslavement) in a way that makes a student “feel discomfort, guilt, (or) anguish.” Twenty-six states are considering or have passed bills to make sure critical race theory is not taught in their public schools. Alas! The reasoning that backs this law doesn’t chime with many including me! So we’re going to make our student as the final arbiter of what teaching areas cause discomfort and therefore removed from curriculum? And is this ‘discomfort’ really detrimental to growth and development, or rather a contributor?

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Respecting Identities

Respecting Identities

(This blog is a response to Kaywin Weldman’s blog: https://www.nga.gov/blog/memory-museums-once-known.html  Kaywin is the National Gallery of Art’s first woman director)  In the December of 2009, I accompanied my husband to the annual Climate Summit held that year in...

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Steve Jobs and Constantin Brancusi

Steve Jobs and Constantin Brancusi

Psychologists have long sought insights into how we make sense of the world, what drives our behavior, and they’ve made enormous strides into lifting that veil of mystery. In this blog, I will attempt to understand the thinking style of two pioneers, in unrelated...

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​​Learning in the Making

​​Learning in the Making

Just this evening, my neighbor’s 7-year old came along with his dad to take a look at our flagstone walkway that we were getting redone. Looking closely at a couple of thick roots that he (rightly) assumed we might have to get cut as they were getting under the...

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Learning to Think Scientifically

Learning to Think Scientifically

Thronged by visitors all year round, the Discovery Room Q?rius in the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History endeavors to unleash children’s curiosity through inquiry-centered, open-ended, hands-on activities imbued with an element of play. While it’s encouraging to...

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Varuna’s Purple Trees

Varuna’s Purple Trees

My friend’s daughter, a 3rd grader in a reputed school in Mumbai, painted purple trees in her art class. The idea of purple trees cut across the grain of the teacher’s ‘traditional beliefs’ about art and judging the color as a “discrepancy,” she harshly scribbled...

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